Chinese Eat Anything That Moves: Traditional Chinese Dish

  “The Chinese eat everything with four legs except tables—and everything that flies except air...

“The Chinese eat everything with four legs except tables—and everything that flies except airplanes”.

While some countries in Asia such as Hong Kong, the Philippines and Taiwan have banned the practice of dog eating, evidence shows that in China, the biggest dog eating country in the world, it continues to thrive.

It is estimated that up to 10 million dogs are slaughtered every year in China, many deliberately slowly and cruelly, while all suffer the stress and pain of being farmed in concentrated numbers before being killed in a variety of ways which rarely ensure a quick and humane death. [Source]

In Guangdong and Guangxi provinces in south-eastern China, some - especially older - people consider cat flesh a good warming food during winter months. However, in northern China eating cat is considered unacceptable. It is estimated that around 4 million cats are eaten in China each year, and that the number is rising. However, overseas visitors are unlikely to come across downtown restaurants serving cat, which is only common out of town and in the city outskirts.

The cat's stomach and intestines may be eaten, as well as meat from the thighs, which are turned into meatballs served with soup, with the head and the rest of the animal then thrown away. In Guangdong, cat meat is a main ingredient in the traditional dish "dragon, tiger, phoenix" (snake, cat, chicken), which is said to fortify the body. [Source]

As with the dog meat situation, the rats and mice consumed in China are not the same rats you would find in your attic or running around in the sewers. The rodents used in traditional Chinese cuisine are a special breed and they are raised from birth to insure purity. They are used like any other meat in dishes. They are often used in main courses and soups. [Source]

There are many ways of eating snake. Their gall bladder was taken out and dipped in a small glass of transparent alcohol. The killer seller then gave it to the onlooker (usually men) who offered the highest price for it. It is believed to be good for manhood.

A visit to the Guolizhuang Restaurant in Beijing is not for the faint-hearted. Here the menu consists almost entirely of penis and testicle dishes -- made from the private parts of deer, snakes, yaks, horses, seals and ducks, among others. The platters have names like "The Essence of the Golden Buddha," "Phoenix Rising," "Jasmine Flowers with 1,000 Layers" and "Look for the Treasure in the Desert Sand." Are such flowery names meant to prevent guests from prematurely running off? After all, the "jasmine flowers" are made of layers of thinly sliced donkey penis, and the "treasure in the desert" is actually sheep gonads on a bed of curry. [Source]

Swikee Kodok Oh, frog legs in tauco soup served with rice at a Chinese ... Frog legs are one of the better-known delicacies of French and Cantonese cuisine.

The Guangzhou supermarket marks different part of the crocodile meat with different price, with the crocodile feet being the most expensive at roughly 40 USD per kilogram. Actually it is not the first time that selling crocodile meat became the news in China, especially when it is sold in Guangdong where the people are famous for “eating everything”. [Source]

Alive, they look like spiky slugs, but preserved on the supermarket shelf they better resemble charred sausages. They’re called sea cucumbers, and for a thousand years in China, eating these strange, gelatinous creatures has been an exalted symbol of wealth and prosperity. Despite their once staggering price tag — roughly $163 a piece, or the equivalent of 4,000 steamed buns, another Chinese culinary staple — government officials once reportedly ate at least one sea cucumber a day. [Source]

Fried ENEMA in China.


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